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ShakinaGlow 70F
34 posts
4/14/2018 3:17 pm
Shekinah glory

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ShakinaGlow 70F

4/16/2018 10:35 am

    Quoting Urban_Hermit:
    I was listening to a Messianic Jew preach recently and he said the Shekinah glory came in flesh in his sermon. Interesting coincidence you mention it here. There's a lot in the Hebrew Biblical perspective we in the West miss. We have a Hellenistic way of thinking.
Hey Urban, thanks for telling me about Shekinah coming in the flesh. While I find some parts of the OT difficult to read, I take note of the following:

Exodus 40:34-35
34 Then the cloud covered the tabernacle of meeting, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle.

35 And Moses was not able to enter the tabernacle of meeting, because the cloud rested above it, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle.

I checked out the Hebrew text in the above scripture, and the word for glory is, "kabowd," which means glorious. It also says that such glory comes in the form of a cloud, interesting. I realize that such glory's appearance wasn't confined to a Tabernacle. You're right about Christians having a Greek, or Hellenistic, way of thinking, suppose that has to do with the new covenant, right?

Good to see you!



ShakinaGlow replies on 4/16/2018 12:46 pm:
Urban, I didn't mean to delete your comment! Oops... sorry about that!

Urban_Hermit 68M
317 posts
4/18/2018 8:58 am

My understanding of the Hellenistic mindset or thinking doesn't come from the New Covenant, the New Covenant is mainly Jewish, with some letters to Gentiles. Hellenistic thinking is the old Greek way of thinking.

It comes from the Greek world view and form of reasoning which Rome adopted and from there most of Western culture. Paul used the Greek reasoning to present the Gospel using 'to the unknown god' dialogue.

That's my understanding anyway, I'll stand corrected though, my history isn't that great. Paul used that 'unknown god' as a lead in to the gospel as I've read that back then that it would have incurred the death penalty to introduce a new god according to their law.

Judgement Day will be interesting.


ShakinaGlow 70F

4/19/2018 6:49 am

    Quoting Urban_Hermit:
    My understanding of the Hellenistic mindset or thinking doesn't come from the New Covenant, the New Covenant is mainly Jewish, with some letters to Gentiles. Hellenistic thinking is the old Greek way of thinking.

    It comes from the Greek world view and form of reasoning which Rome adopted and from there most of Western culture. Paul used the Greek reasoning to present the Gospel using 'to the unknown god' dialogue.

    That's my understanding anyway, I'll stand corrected though, my history isn't that great. Paul used that 'unknown god' as a lead in to the gospel as I've read that back then that it would have incurred the death penalty to introduce a new god according to their law.
Good morning Urban, your comment is both welcoming and humbling because it sheds light on a Bible history of which I admittedly know little. Your comment caused me to go online and take notes, but responses to this post would be better served by others in the know, like you! Here's my takeaway, agree or refute if necessary:

Greeks followed law

Greek language Aramaic

Hellenism affected Christianity by Gnosticism, where the physical was deemed evil and caused questions re. Jesus being fully man or fully God;

Apatheia considers nature unstoppable and martyrdom a virtue;

Greeks rejected Monotheism or a Christian-Judeo belief in one God. By virtue of Hellenism, it appears Christians and Jews paid heavily for their one-God ideology;

Being that Greek became the ubiquitous language, Jewish scholars translated Hebrew scriptures into Greek out of necessity, creating the Septuagint;

Thus evolves Apologetics, which is defending one’s belief through self-expression; and finally,

Logos, this having to do with explanation of the Word.

Urban, thanks for getting me into studying Bible history this morning as my laundry churns, my meatloaf bakes, and I sip the last drop of a 2nd cup of Costco coffee!



ShakinaGlow replies on 4/21/2018 11:54 am:
I find it curious that some people have posts on here with a gazillion views but no comments; and yet others like me have virtually no views but do have comments. Perhaps if click and click and click on this post I'll have a gazillion views too? Maybe I should recruit "BC friends" to lend me a clicky hand? Lots of questions? Do I sound like Pete aka Meow? How IS Pete aka Meow, anyway? God bless!

Urban_Hermit 68M
317 posts
4/26/2018 9:23 am

Being that Greek became the ubiquitous language, Jewish scholars translated Hebrew scriptures into Greek out of necessity, creating the Septuagint;

Commenting on your line above.

Below is part of a sermon by Jacob Prasch titled "The Bible and false interpretations" I've typed a bit of what he said.

The Jews who returned from the Babylonian Captivity left something in Babylon, specifically their mother tongue. They no longer knew Hebrew, they spoke Chaldean, they spoke a dialect in Aramaic which evolved into a Hebrew dialect in Aramaic. But whenever revival takes place they read from the book, Neh 8:8 the scroll, the Torah of God translating or explaining to give it sense so they understood the reading. The people no longer understood the meaning of the original Hebrew text. This began the tradition of the Scribes. Their job among other things was to be as accurate as they could in putting the Hebrew Scriptures across in a way people could understand it and in copying the manuscripts. Well the priority is on the original languages, understand this, there is only one verse in Scripture that addresses the issue of translation, only one! Neh 8:8 and it says the priority is the original meaning in the original language, that's what is says.
Neh 8:8 "So they read in the book in the law of God distinctly, and gave the sense, and caused them to understand the reading."
This becomes much more complicated than some people would have us recognise. For instance why does the New Testament apart from the partial exception of Matthew largely follow the Septuagint, the Greek Old Testament instead of the original Hebrew? It's not as straight forward as people would have us believe.

He goes on but for brevity I'll not post more. I found it interesting.

Judgement Day will be interesting.


ShakinaGlow 70F

4/26/2018 7:14 pm

    Quoting Urban_Hermit:
    Being that Greek became the ubiquitous language, Jewish scholars translated Hebrew scriptures into Greek out of necessity, creating the Septuagint;

    Commenting on your line above.

    Below is part of a sermon by Jacob Prasch titled "The Bible and false interpretations" I've typed a bit of what he said.

    The Jews who returned from the Babylonian Captivity left something in Babylon, specifically their mother tongue. They no longer knew Hebrew, they spoke Chaldean, they spoke a dialect in Aramaic which evolved into a Hebrew dialect in Aramaic. But whenever revival takes place they read from the book, Neh 8:8 the scroll, the Torah of God translating or explaining to give it sense so they understood the reading. The people no longer understood the meaning of the original Hebrew text. This began the tradition of the Scribes. Their job among other things was to be as accurate as they could in putting the Hebrew Scriptures across in a way people could understand it and in copying the manuscripts. Well the priority is on the original languages, understand this, there is only one verse in Scripture that addresses the issue of translation, only one! Neh 8:8 and it says the priority is the original meaning in the original language, that's what is says.
    Neh 8:8 "So they read in the book in the law of God distinctly, and gave the sense, and caused them to understand the reading."
    This becomes much more complicated than some people would have us recognise. For instance why does the New Testament apart from the partial exception of Matthew largely follow the Septuagint, the Greek Old Testament instead of the original Hebrew? It's not as straight forward as people would have us believe.

    He goes on but for brevity I'll not post more. I found it interesting.
Hi there Urban, the site is a little glitchy right now, but you have my full attention.

After reading your comment, I went online for awhile, and read here and there about the Septuagint. It's odd because as I alternate between answering your comment and reading about the Septuagint, I have this deja vu sensation, somewhat supernatural, like I've read up on it awhile back, but how would I forget such a thing?

Yes, the Nehemiah 8:8 scripture caught my interest, in that I googled the Hebrew text analysis in the Strong's Concordance to further delve. When "the sense" is referred to, the Hebrew word used is sekel, a masculine noun that means insight. Some other synonyms are discretion, knowledge, policy, prudence, sense, understanding, wisdom, wise... as if the persons who gained knowledge were imbued in it miraculously. Urban, what I've done in the past is check scripture in the Strong's Concordance whenever in doubt or simply curious. And after having done that, what I gleaned is Nehemiah 8:8 refers more to the supernatural experience of receiving discernment of the texts from God than the act of translating itself; a visit from Shekinah Glory, if you will. Forgive me if I sound nebulous, I'm praying my way through this answer, I'm open to correction. God bless you