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Synopsis Home Acts Introduction
Acts
Introduction
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapters 3 and 4
Chapter 5
Chapters 6 and 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapters 10 to 11:18
Chapters 11:19 to 30
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapters 18:1 to 19:7
Chapters 19: 8 to 41
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27
Chapter 28

The three divisions of the book

The Acts of the Apostles are divided essentially into three parts -- Acts 1, Acts 2 to 12; and Acts 13 to the end. Acts 11 and Acts 12 may be termed transitional chapters founded on the event related in Acts 10. Acts 1 gives us that which is connected with the Lord's resurrection; Acts 2-12 that work of the Holy Ghost of which Jerusalem and the Jews were the centre, but which branches out into the free action of the Spirit of God, independent of, but not separated from, the twelve and Jerusalem as the centre; Acts 13, and the succeeding chapters, the work of Paul, flowing from a more distinct mission from Antioch; Acts 15 connecting the two in order to preserve unity in the whole course. We have indeed the admission of Gentiles in the second part, but it is in connection with the work going on among the Jews. These latter had rejected the witness of the Holy Ghost to a glorified Christ, as they had rejected the Son of God in His humiliation; and God prepared a work outside them, in which the apostle of the Gentiles laid foundations that annulled the distinction between Jew and Gentile, and which unite them -- as in themselves equally dead in trespasses and sins -- to Christ, the Head of His body, the assembly, in heaven.*

{*It is a sorrowful but instructive thing to see, in the last division of the book, how the spiritual energy of a Paul closes, as to its effect in work, in the shadow of a prison. Yet we see the wisdom of God in it. The boasted apostolicism of Rome never had an apostle but as a prisoner; and Christianity, as the Epistle to the Romans testifies, was already planted there.}

Synopsis by John Darby