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Synopsis Home Jeremiah Chapter 33
Jeremiah
Introduction
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapters 4 to 6
Chapters 7 to 9
Chapter 10
Chapters 11 and 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapters 19 and 20
Chapters 21 to 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
Chapters 27 and 28
Chapter 29
Chapter 30
Chapters 31 and 32
Chapter 33
Chapter 34
Chapter 35
Chapter 36
Chapters 37 and 38
Chapters 39 to 44
Chapters 49 to 51
Chapter 52

The King-Priest, the Son of David, in whom Jeremiah's covenant will be fulfilled

Chapter 33 repeats with ample and rich abundance the testimony to these blessings, and dwells particularly on the presence of the Messiah; it announces that the branch of righteousness shall grow up unto David, executing judgment and righteousness in the land. Judah shall be saved and Jerusalem shall dwell safely. Her name shall be "Jehovah our Righteousness." David shall never want a man to sit upon the throne of the house of Israel (not merely Judah), nor the tribe of Levi a priest. The Lord's covenant with the heavens and the earth shall fail, before this covenant with David shall be broken. However deeply sunk in despair the people might be, the Lord would never cast off Jacob, or His servant David, but would cause their captivity to return and would have mercy on them. The reader will remark how complete this revelation of deliverance is in its objects: first Judah, who was then particularly in question, then all Israel, then the land, then Messiah and the priesthood. Although, as a comfort to those in Babylon, the captive Jews are encouraged with a sure hope on their repentance (chap. 29); yet in general Judah is joined with Israel in the same deliverance. It is looked at as a whole. Indeed, after chapter 29, save chapter 31: 23, 24, where Ephraim had been already distinguished, and chapter 33: 7, 10, 16, in present grace because of the siege, Israel is always put before Judah when both are named, and God glories in the name of the God of Israel. We do not get in Jeremiah the rejection of Messiah. His subject is present sins, and future purposes in which Messiah comes in. With this chapter the second part of the book closes, that is, the revelation of the full effect of God's grace towards ruined Israel, a result which should be according to His purposes of love, and perfect according to His counsels.

Synopsis by John Darby