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Synopsis Home 1 Chronicles Chapters 6 to 9:34
1 Chronicles
Introduction
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3 to 5
Chapters 6 to 9:34
Chapters 9:35 to 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapters 18 to 20
Chapter 21
Chapters 22 to 27
Chapters 28
Chapters 29

Levi's genealogies and those of other tribes

In the genealogies of Levi (chap. 6) we see, first of all, the line of high priests until the captivity; and then the Levites, their services and their cities. After Levi come Issachar (chap. 7: 1), Benjamin (chap. 7: 6), Naphtali (chap. 7: 13), few in number; the other half tribe of Manasseh (chap. 7: 14), Ephraim (chap. 7: 20), and Asher (chap. 7: 30). Then we find Benjamin again (chap. 8), first of all with reference to Jerusalem, and afterwards in connection with the family of Saul.

The genealogies reveal that where there was faith God blessed individually

But that which has been preserved here of the genealogies of the people -- an affecting remnant (through grace) of those who had fallen under the sorrowful condemnation of "Lo-ruhamah" and "Lo-ammi" -- reveals to us another circumstance, namely, that, wherever there has been faith, God has blessed His people individually. Jabez (chap. 4: 9, 10), the son of affliction, seeking blessing in the presence of the God of Israel, failed not to find it. Jehovah enlarged his borders, and so kept him from evil that it grieved him not. Simeon, although dispersed in Israel, was able to drive out the enemy and possess their land, even unto mount Seir. The two tribes and a half beyond Jordan enlarged their territories also, and possessed the gates of their enemies, "because they cried unto God." Afterwards they were carried away captives, because they forsook God. Thus, although there was neither the power of the king nor the order of the kingdom, yet, wherever there was faith, God blessed those of His people who trusted in Him.

The preservation of genealogy the proof of faith

These genealogies were imperfect. The condition of Israel bore the impress of the ruin which had befallen them; but also that of the goodness of God who had brought back a remnant, and who had preserved all that was needful to place those who formed it in the record of His people. If the needful proof to give them a title to this were wanting, such as were of the people ceased to enjoy their proper privileges, and the priests their sacerdotal position, until a priest stood up with Urim and with Thummim. For these genealogies served as a means to recognise the people. Happy he who had preserved his own, and who had so appreciated the heritage of Jehovah as to attach value to it! It was a proof of faith; for, it might have been said, Of what use are these genealogies in Babylon?

The use made of genealogies

As to the Levites -- for it is good to serve the Lord -- their genealogies, their cities, and their services were known with sufficient certainty, even with respect to those that dwelt at Jerusalem. The mercy of God has not forgotten either to preserve a lamp in the house of Saul; for in judgment God remembers mercy. Chapter 9 teaches us the use which they made of their genealogies; for those mentioned in it are persons who had returned from the captivity, as may be seen in Nehemiah 11. This portion of the book closes at chapter 9: 34. Verse 35 begins the narrative.

Synopsis by John Darby